the geography of heartbreak, a poem … in all the years of recorded history only 248 have seen no wars

Zenaida_Macroura


a dove’s eye view is an ugly view
of the geography of heartbreak, of
smothered hope and broken children

sadly we watch their unrestrained
curls burst into a stormy cumulus,
while their dislocation wears a path
cut by tiny feet in forced march
alongside a wholly damaged trust

“The derivative effects of exposure to war-related stressors on the developing child are far-ranging and affect the elaboration and consolidation of personality structures, identity formation, adaptive and coping mechanisms, internalized standards of right and wrong, intrinsic mechanisms for modulating aggressive impulses, the habitual mode of relating to others in addition to having enduring neurobiological consequences . . .. “ Psychological Effects of War and Terrorism on Children

That report also states that in the “3,421 years of recorded history” only 248 have seen no wars. So, we are continually wounding little souls who are in effect then turned into potential time-bombs. No wonder we’ve been unable to get out from under, even in the 21st Century.

See also Joanna Santa Barbara’s Impact of War on Children and Imperative to End War, which discusses primary prevention (ways to end war), secondary prevention (ways to make the experience of war less damaging), and tietiary prevention (ways to rehabilitate children who have been traumatized by exposure to the death, violence, separation and other impacts of war).

© 2017, poem, Jamie Dedes, All rights reserved; mourning dove by Octavio Tellis via Wikipedia under CC BY-SA 3.0 license

Imagine Loneliness Without Solitude, a poem


Imagine nothing,
nothing to read, no way to write
no way to see your thoughts laid out in gray on white

Imagine loneliness,
loneliness without solitude
no way to clear the mind or cleanse the soul

Imagine children,
children conceived in hate
mothers unable to provide or protect

Imagine,
just imagine
knowing only
war
abandonment
poverty
ignorance
powerlessness
hunger
pain
pain
only pain.

Imagine,
just imagine dying before you are old enough to know who you are

© Jamie Dedes

An early version of this poem was published online in Sam Hamill’s Poets Against the War. Some of the first poems from that effort were collected in an anthology. All the poems are now archived at a university but at this point I’m at a loss to remember which one. The poem was later published in Salamander Cove. I pulled Imagine out and dusted it off today in response to current events and the associated reckless rhetoric.


Thugs from hell have taken freedom’s store
The rich get richer, the poor die quicker

& the only god that sanctions that

Is no god at all but rhetorical crap

excerpt from The Ballad of Girly Man in Girly Man by Charles Bernstein

BREAKING NEWS/HEADS-UP GENEVA ~ Geopolitics of Oil in Fiction, an opportunity to meet Vahan Zanoyan, author of “The Sacred Sands”


Open class of “Global Energy Economy” course of Prof. Rouben Indjikian at Webster University Geneva, LLC Commons Room, 30 May 2017, 13:10-15:30
Register HERE

At its peak, crude oil represented half of the world’s energy consumption, and it remains the biggest internationally traded commodity. The petroleum industry has evolved under different price regimes, market organizations and power relations between the main producing and consuming countries and companies organizing the supply chains. While the geopolitics of petroleum in the twentieth century was determined by securing access to crude oil, currently it is perceived as a factor disrupting the supply of crude oil, especially from the Middle East, owning bulk of world petroleum reserves. So how important is the geopolitical economy of petroleum and what would be its role in the future energy landscape?

The evolution of oil industry and, in particular, geopolitics of Middle East oil, where fundamental truths are best depicted in a novel, will be presented by its author Vahan Zanoyan*, on a visit to Webster University. Vahan, will explain the complex relationships in the industry and how his vast personal experience as an adviser to oil companies, governments, investors and traders led him to write The Sacred Sands, “a gripping novel that takes the reader inside the Middle Eastern oil industry and regional geopolitics.”

The presentation will be followed by comments from John Gault, a prominent international expert in the oil industry, with an interactive discussion moderated by Rouben Indjikian.

This class is free and open to the public. Register HERE
Tuesday, May 30
Webster University Geneva, LLC Commons Room
Route de Collex 9 1293 Bellevue, Switzerland


Well, those of us who won’t be in Geneva next week can always read the book. I can’t offer you a review at this point because I’ve only just read the “Look Inside” sample on Amazon. So far so good. These reviews are quoted by Amazon:

“the story is relentlessly paced and brimming with historical insight…this will undoubtedly be a feast for anyone who’s hungry for knowledge about the Middle East …  An exceptionally erudite…portrait of a key point in a region’s history.” Kirkus Reviews
 *****
“The scope of this novel is breathtaking… The Sacred Sands is very well written with an intriguing plot that will keep you hooked to the very end. What you will also gain from the book is a clear analysis of the problems in the Middle East, the rise of Islamic Fundamentalism and the way that we in the West view the region, from the pen of someone who has a deep understanding of this area. Vahan Zanoyan is a consummate storyteller and has managed to present an incredibly complex subject in a clear, erudite, and most certainly entertaining way. I urge you to read this book – it is the most accomplished novel I have read this year and I can thoroughly recommend it.” Readers’ Favorite Reviews

the sun is in love with me, a poem … and your Wednesday Writing Prompt


what a morning, good morning
burst of apricot, showering light
drizzling glee, a child’s laughter
if I had to live for just one day
it would be this one, morning-glory
nodding her bright-eyed blue head
and i know, there’s no such thing
no such thing as a death star
there’s only life, over hill and field
shining into windows, on warm grass
Look! the daisies are smiling
and the California poppies are
popping yellow like corn in a pot
the moon was muse last night
today the sun is in love with me

© 2013, poem and photograph, Jamie Dedes, All rights reserved


WEDNESDAY WRITING PROMPT

Tell us in poem or prose what it feels like to be you on your best day.  If you are comfortable sharing your work, leave it in the comment section below. If it’s too long, you can leave a link to it. All work will be published here next Tuesday. Enjoy!


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