SUNDAY ANNOUNCEMENTS: Calls for Submissions, Contests, Events and Other News and Information

CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

Opportunity Knocks

BAOBAB PRESS, Where good books are grown has an open call for submissions for an anthology of short fiction, This Side of the Divide, in which they plan to feature emerging and established authors exploring the Western United States. Length: 3,000 – 5,000 words. Payment if your story is selected for the anthology: $100 and a copy of the anthology. Deadline: October 31, 2017. Details HERE. This anthology is through a partnership of Baobab Press and University of Nevada, Reno MFA Program in Creative Writing.

Baobab Press also seeks submissions of creative non-fiction manuscripts (125 – 400 pages); novel manuscripts (125 – 400 pages); poetry manuscripts (40 – 100 pages); comics (50 – 100 pages); and short story collections (125-250 pages).  Details HERE

THE ILLANOT REVIEW is still open for submissions to be consider for its next issue. Graphics, poetry, fiction to 4,000 words, flash fiction and creative nonfiction.  Deadline September 30. Details HERE.

BAD PONY, a lit mag,an online publication, is open for submissions of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and art. They read on a rolling basis. A fledgling publication, they are reading now for their first and second edition.  Submission guidelines HERE.

WORLD ENOUGH WRITERS is open for submissions for its Coffee Poems Anthology to be edited by Lorraine Healy. $5 submission fee for two or more poems. Deadline: February 28, 2018. Details HERE.

THE BIG MUDDY, A Journal of the Mississippi River Valley publishes two-times a year and invites submissions of poetry, fiction, essays, photography and art.  Details and submissions HERE.

SMOKELONG QUARTERLY, an online literary magazine devoted to flash fiction accepts work up to 1,000 words. Guidelines HERE

SMOKELONG FRIDGE-FLASH FOR CHILDREN under twelve years. Stories, art or a combination thereof. Must be submitted by parent with permission to publish.  Details HERE.

NATIONAL GIRLS & WOMEN OF COLOR COUNCIL, INC. (NGWCC) calls for submissions for an anthology. Deadline: December 31, 2017. Personal stories, poems, essays and other short stories. Details HERE.

THE BeZINE submissions for the October 2017 issue – themed Music – are open and the deadline is October 10thSend submissions to me [Jamie] at bardogroup@gmail.com. Publication is October 15th. Poetry, essays, fiction and creative nonfiction, art and photography, music (videos or essays), and whatever lends itself to online presentation is welcome for consideration. No demographic restrictions and submissions of work relative to your country and its history and culture are welcome. The more diverse the representation, the better. English only or accompanied by translation into English. Please check out a few issues first and the Intro/Mission Statement and Submission Guidelines. We do not publish anything that promotes hate or violence.  The lead for the October issue is Sheffield poet and musician, John Anstie (My Poetry Library and 42).

Note: I will consider previously published work as long as you hold the copyright. / Jamie Dedes

PALAMEDES PUBLISHING has an open call for creative essay for its Finding Light in Unexpected Place (2018), An Anthology of Surprises. Deadline December 1st.  Details HERE.

CRANNÓG MAGAZINE has an open call for submissions for its upcoming issue. There’s a November deadline for the February 2018 issue. This magazine publishes poetry under 50 lines, stories up to 2,000 words. “Writers selected to appear in Crannóg will receive: a contributor’s copy and €50 per story, €30 per poem; an invitation to attend/read at the launch of Crannóg at The Crane Bar, Galway, Ireland; three contributors will be nominated for the Forward Prize for best single poem; and six contributors will be nominated for a Pushcart Prize, (poetry and fiction).” Details HERE.


CONTESTS

WILDA HEARNE FLASH FICTION CONTEST 2017 is accepting submissions through October 1st. $15 reading fee. Cash award: $500. Publication in Big Muddy. Details HERE.

MIGHTY RIVER SHORT STORY CONTEST 2017 is accepting submissions through October 1st.  Reading fee: $20. Cash award: $1,000. Publication in Big Muddy. Details HERE.


FELLOWSHIP

SMOKELONG QUARTERLY “is accepting submissions for its 2018 Kathy Fish Fellowship for new and emerging writers. The fellowship honors Kathy Fish, a former editor here at SmokeLong, a fantastic writer herself, and a continuing champion of new and emerging writers.

“The winner of the 2018 Kathy Fish Fellowship will be considered a “writer in residence” at SmokeLong (note: position is virtual) for four quarterly issues (March, June, September, and December 2018). Each issue will include one flash by the Fellowship winner.” $5 suggested donation. Details HERE.


EVENTS

  • The Poet by Day, Wednesday Writing Prompt, online and all are invited to take part no matter the stage of career (emerging or established) or status (amateur or professional) Poems related to the challenge of the week will be published here on the following Tuesday.
  • Cheltenham Poetry Festival 2018 ~ The theme is power. ‘ A poetry party with a healthy dose of anarchy’ – the Guardian. Details HERE.
  • Poets on Craft, Remica Bingham-Risher, Tuesday, September 16 from 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm EDT at The New School, Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, 55 West 13th Street, New York, 10011 Admission free. Kid Friendly.
  • New Orleans Poetry Festival and Small Press Fair April 19, 7 pm CDT “will feature three days and nights of poetry readings and performances, panel discussions, fiction events, a small press fair with books for sale and display, musical acts, slam events, walking tours, open mic at the famous Maple Leaf Bar, and much more…” Details HERE.
  • Reading Philip Whalen, a belated celebration of his birthday, Monday, October 23 rom 7 pm to 8 pm PST at Moe’s Books, 2475 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, CA  94704
  • Paul Madonna: Close Enough for Angels, Wednesday, October from 7 pm – 8 pm PST, Moe’s Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley CA 84704
  • Workshop with Diana Goetsch, Saturday, October 21 from 10 am to 4 pm PST, Marin Poetry Center, San Rafael, CA  94901. $100/125/150 sliding scale. Details on this and other Marin Poetry Center events HERE.
  • CALLING ALL POETS, WRITERS, MUSICIANS AND ARTISTS: We need your most passionate work. The Bezine 100,000 Poets (and other artists and friends) for Change virtual “live”event will run from 12:01 am September 30 to midnight and perhaps longer on The BeZine blog. Details HERE.
  • Sheffield in Harmony hosted by Hallmark of Harmony (Poet John Anstie’s group), October 7, 2017, Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Firth Court. Firth Hall. Sheffield University. “Hallmark of Harmony’s annual production will showcase the considerable barbershop singing talent of our great city. We are proud to share the stage with Sheffield Harmony, who are among the leading female barbershop choruses in the UK. Moreover, this stellar lineup will be complemented by no less than UK champions and World Silver Medallist Mixed quartet, Hannah and the Hurricanes! This is going to be a phenomenal show.” Tickets HERE.

POETRY RESISTANCE WALL

100,000 Poets for Change (100TPC) founders, Michael Rothenberg and Terri Carrion, have “built” a Resistance Poetry Wall in response to calls from all over the world for a place to post poetry and art in reaction to January’s election here in the U.S.

You do not have to limit your poetry to the situation in the States. You can share work that is relative to your country or your specific concerns. As Michael and Terri state:

The poetry and art posted on the WALL are not limited to the USA elections. There are many issues that concern us all and we welcome your contribution to this page.”

These efforts do have their place and power. So far 190 people have shared work on The Poetry Resistance Wall. I hope to see you there too. / Jamie

OTHER NEWS AND INFORMATION


YOUR SUNDAY ANNOUNCEMENTS may be emailed to thepoetbyday@gmail.com. Please do so at least a week in advance.

If you would like me to consider reviewing your book, chapbook, magazine or film, here are some general guidelines:

  • nothing that foments hate or misunderstanding
  • nothing violent or encouraging of violence
  • English only, though Spanish is okay if accompanied by translation
  • though your book or other product doesn’t have to be available through Amazon for review here, it should be easy for readers to find through your site or other venues.

DISCLAIMER

Often information is just that information – and not necessarily recommendation. I haven’t worked with all the publications featured in Sunday Announcements or elsewhere on this site. Awards and contests are often a means to generate income and publicity for the host organizations, some of which are more reputable than others. I am homebound due to disability and no longer attend events. Please be sure to verify information for yourself before submitting work, buying products, paying fees or attending events et al.

Affiliate Links Disclosure:
Some product links within posts are Amazon affiliate links. The Poet by Day is supported in part by these links. Your use of them costs you nothing and helps to keep this site running. When you click on an affiliate link (not all links are affiliate) and/or make a purchase I sometimes receive a small percentage of the purchase price. Thank you for your support.


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Thoughts and Guidelines on the Call for Submissions to the October Issue of “The BeZine” themed Music

John Anstie

” Musick has charms to soothe a savage breast “
~ Playwright and Poet, William Congreve (1670-1729), in his 1697 play, ‘The Mourning Bride’.

A letter from John:

In asking for submissions of writing, poetry, art and even music itself for the Music themed October issue of The BeZine, I am conscious that the very subject of music leaves us with a huge scope. But if I am to offer any guidelines as to what you could think about in submitting work, it might be as follows.

My personal perspective on the value of poetry has some relevance here. It is a belief that poetry should always be one step removed from the obvious, the logical and rational, in order for it to awaken the right brain, the creative side of our amazing abilities as humans; to stimulate the visceral (as opposed to the purely intellectual, rational, ‘logical’) response. In turn, this has the potential to stimulate a fresh approach to solving the challenges, be they personal or global. This hits on the core mission of The BeZine in a big way.

But if poetry has this potential power to stimulate a new way of thinking outside the framework imposed by a culture of consumerism, greed and material comfort, as opposed to our social well-being, then music does so with a vengeance. It is truly visceral without the constraints of language. Of course, when the poetry of lyrics is introduced to create song, then there is the opportunity to create something that is greater than the sum of its parts; synergy. It can provide something that dwells in the conscious and even subconscious for a lifetime – whoever forgets the words and melody of a song that they heard at a very poignant moment in their lives, which continues to inhabit a special place in memory, resonate and invoke the most emotional response every time it is heard. Some might argue this is ‘just an over-emotional response’, but I would say that it could be, nay is a key to how we may bring humanity together.

So that may be the most long-winded, not to say ‘visceral’ guideline to what I’m thinking for this issue. But I hope if nothing else it helps to focus your thoughts, as if they needed to be focused in the first place!

As ever, there are no imposed constraints, if you can provide anything with a musical theme, be it an explanation in prose or poetry of why you love a particular piece or genre of music, or even and especially a link to your favourite song or symphony, aria or opera, concerto or cantata, please let us have it. It could also be a reason why, in some instances music, song, an anthem can be used against our interests, in shoring up a malevolent dictatorship, for example, or promoting anti-social behaviours. It could equally be a short history of folk music, which often tends to tell the stories of the downtrodden masses, or of unrequited love, or … your own story. All is relevant to the October’s theme.

There are, in my book of music, no boundaries to its variety and opportunity for new arrangements and collaborations that stand to provide us and future generations with food for love and peace and social justice and to sustain us all in that future. ”

Peace and love
John


THE BeZINE submissions for the October 2017 issue – themed Music – are open and the deadline is October 10thSend submissions to me [Jamie] at bardogroup@gmail.com. Publication is October 15th. Poetry, essays, fiction and creative nonfiction, art and photography, music (videos or essays), and whatever lends itself to online presentation is welcome for consideration. No demographic restrictions and submissions of work relative to our country and its history and culture are welcome. The more diverse the representation, the better. English only or accompanied by translation into English. Please check out a few issues first and the Intro/Mission Statement and Submission Guidelines. We do not publish anything that promotes hate or violence.  The lead for the October issue is Sheffield poet and musician, John Anstie (My Poetry Library and 42).

  • CALLING ALL POETS, WRITERS, ARTISTS AND MUSICIANS: We need your most passionate work on September 30 for The BeZine 100,000 Poets (and other artists and friends) for Change live online event.
  • Heads-up on the November zine: The theme is Hunger, Poverty and Working-class Slavery. Deadline: November 10. 

JOHN ANSTIE (My Poetry Library and 42) ~ is a British writer, poet and musician –  a multi-talented gentleman self-described as a “Family man, Grandfather, Occasional Musician, Singer, Amateur photographer and Film-maker, Apple-MAC user, Implementation Manager, and Engineer”. He has participated in d’Verse Poet’s Pub and is a player in New World Creative Union as well as a being a ‘spoken-voice’ participant in Roger Allen Baut’s excellent ‘Blue Sky Highway‘ radio broadcasts. He’s been blogging since the beginning of 2011. He is also a member of The Poetry Society (UK) and is one of the stellar team that comprises The Bardo Group Begines, publishers of The BeZine.

  • Sheffield in Harmony hosted by Hallmark of Harmony (Poet John Anstie’s group), October 7, 2017, Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Firth Court. Firth Hall. Sheffield University. “Hallmark of Harmony’s annual production will showcase the considerable barbershop singing talent of our great city. We are proud to share the stage with Sheffield Harmony, who are among the leading female barbershop choruses in the UK. Moreover, this stellar lineup will be complemented by no less than UK champions and World Silver Medallist Mixed quartet, Hannah and the Hurricanes! This is going to be a phenomenal show.” Tickets HERE.

Here is an interview of John. I [Jamie] invite you to get to know him better:  Petrichor Rising and how the Twitterverse birthed friendships that in turn birthed a poetry collection

Celebration Bonfires, Putting Rejection and Other Writerly Frustrations in Perspective


American Novelist and Short Story Writer, Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987)

“I would go home in the evening and write short stories and mail them to magazine editors in New York. The stories, no matter how many times I rewrote them, were always returned, usually without comment, with unfailing promptness. I received so many rejection slips, and such an interesting variety, that I passed them neatly into a stamp collector’s album.  The only consolation I ever got out of them for many years was in visualizing how big a celebration bonfire I could make with them when I had my first short story accepted and published in a magazine.” Erskine Caldwell, “Call it Experience,” in The Creative Writer


Many many years ago – circa 1964 – I read The Creative Writer (quoted above), which is out of print now. You can find old copies, not that you necessarily need to. Much is outdated. At the time, I found it helpful and inspirational. The book, a collection of instructional and inspirational essays, was published by Writer’s Digest, the publishers of the magazine by that name.  This was my go-to place to hob-nob with writers and publishers, a publication I read through high school and even into my son’s grammar school years. He told me not too long ago that as a child he found it rather magical that it showed up no matter where we moved.

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My other go-to magazine was The Writer. These magazines didn’t so much teach me how to write as offer me some knowledge of the business of writing, which has changed much since then. A story perhaps for another day. The articles I read  instilled a sense of perspective, rational expectations (do NOT read lowered expectations), and a stronger determination. I discovered that sending my writing out into the world is like applying for a job. I do my homework and refine my technique and that improves the odds. Nonetheless, it’s still a numbers game and I may never know why I get a rejection slip. I don’t always know why I get an acceptance letter (or email) either.

Reading what others had to say about the business of studying markets, writing query letters and submitting work helped me to understand that I had to keep on keeping on. This was a good thing. My first poem was published when I was seventeen and that created some rather unrealistic expectations. I thought I was such a hot-shot that my seventeenth year was also the year I submitted a short story to Mademoiselle magazine (closed 2001) for its annual fiction contest. The contest was for college students. I was still in high school. I lied and put Brooklyn College on the entry form. Joyce Carol Oats won.

All this is to say I am reminded of my history because now and again I get emails from discouraged writers and I’m finally – FINALLY – getting around to reading Victor Villaseñor’s Macho!  Apropos this post, I found his dedication interesting:

“To my parents …. after ten years of writing and 260 rejections – my first one! …” [My emphasis.]

Also interesting is his author’s note to the 1997 paperback edition:

Mexican-American Writer, Victor Villaseñor (b. 1940)

“In re-reading Macho! I found out that I am not the same person who wrote that book twenty years ago. I thought of rewriting parts of it – feeling almost ashamed of some sections. But then I got to thinking, hell, the 60s were the 60s and that’s who I was then, so I’m not going to change it. It’s rough and sometimes it sings as badly off-key as Bob Dylan – he was no Joan Baez, believe me – but what it says is still important.”

In my small way, I know what he means by the roughness and dissonance. I’ve been shredding years of my newspaper column clips. After reading a couple, I couldn’t stand it. Not only did I dislike much of the writing but I disagreed with the opinions I’d expressed. One problem with writing is that floundering is so visible. I shudder to think who among family, friends and colleagues might have read that material. It does take a certain amount of chutzpah to be a writer, not as much as public speaking but almost.

Yes! I know what you think. Writing is an art. It’s also a job. Every job has its downside. With writing it’s rejection slips, growing personally and artistically in public, and that aspect which requires some sales savvy, something most of us would rather not pursue. These, however, are part of the package.  

After some 360 rejections, Erskine Caldwell went on to critical acclaim and controversy for Tobacco Road (1931) and God’s Little Acre (1933), both made into movies. Twenty-five of his novels, 150 of his short stories, twelve nonfiction collections, two autobiographies and two YA books were published. He edited American Folkways, a series of books about various regions in the U.S. Apparently, he got over rejection slips, chalked them up to “experience” and moved on.

My celebration bonfire: Not a bonfire at all, just shredding and shedding of old clips I’d rather not see anymore and feeling grateful for the lessons learned, the opportunities enjoyed, the writing life and my fellow poets and writers who enrich my time on earth with their own art and insights.

© 2017, Jamie Dedes; photocredits, Erskine Caldwell (1975), public domain and Victor Villaseñor courtesy of Jeffrey Beall under CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

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ABOUT THE POET BY DAY

philosopher’s stone, a poem … and your Wednesday Writing Prompt

living in a redwood forest,
cradling the wild and rocky,
nursing cold creeks
and ancient sequoia

he’s balding and blue-eyed,
steps out in running shoes,
old blue jeans, a white
t-shirt smelling of bleach

he flies high with
wings woven of words,
alchemical words,
philosopher’s stone

© 2013, poem, Jamie Dedes, All rights reserved; Photo credit ~ MorgueFile


WEDNESDAY WRITING PROMPT

Write a poem about a poet, writer or artist you know. Capture their essence and, if you feel comfortable, share your work or a link to it in the comments below.  All are welcome, emerging or established. Prompt inspired poems will be featured here next Tuesday.


ABOUT THE POET BY DAY