National Museum of the American Indian Recognizes the International Year of Indigenous Languages and Stories of Women

Adeana Young plays Hlaaya in Gwaai Edenshaw and Helen Haig-Brown’s Film Sgaawaay K’uuna/Edge of the Knife. Photo credit Niijang Xyaalas Productions. Copyright Isuma Distribution International. / courtesy of and copyright of Smithsonian

“There’s no longer a need to make films with the intention of creating work that’s palatable to the mainstream; audiences are meeting the filmmakers where they are, and the Native Cinema Showcase is the museum’s way of supporting this effort.” Kevin Grover, director of the National Museum of the American Indian.



The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian presents the 19th annual Native Cinema Showcase in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Aug. 13–18. In this year’s installment, nearly all of the films were made by Native filmmakers; more than half were made by women, including the opening and closing films. This year’s event includes 53 films from 11 countries, representing nearly 40 Indigenous groups.

If you are reading this post from an email subscription, you’re likely have to link to the site to view this The Edge of Knife film trailer.

In an affirmation of the power of self-representation, and in recognition of the International Year of Indigenous Languages, the lineup includes films such as SGaawaay K’uuna (Edge of the Knife), the first feature-length film to be spoken entirely in the Haida language, and Wiñaypacha (Eternity), the first feature-length film shot entirely in the Aymara language. The showcase includes dialogue and narration in 20 Indigenous languages.

“More and more, Native filmmakers are able to use their medium to assert Indigenous identities on their own terms,” said Kevin Gover, director of the National Museum of the American Indian. “There’s no longer a need to make films with the intention of creating work that’s palatable to the mainstream; audiences are meeting the filmmakers where they are, and the Native Cinema Showcase is the museum’s way of supporting this effort.”

The showcase begins and ends with portraits of strong women. Tuesday evening’s feature film, Warrior Women, shows the role of women in the American Indian Movement of the 1970s from a female perspective. The closing film, Vai, incorporates languages of Oceania as it follows the journey of one woman across eight Indigenous communities throughout the Pacific Islands. Saturday’s family-friendly feature, Disney’s Ralph Breaks the Internet, brings together Disney princesses including Pocahontas as they question the stereotypical roles they fell into during past film appearances.

The showcase runs in conjunction with the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts Santa Fe Indian Market, the largest juried show of Native fine art in the world. The majority of the films will be screened at the New Mexico History Museum, and Ralph Breaks the Internet will screen outdoors at the Santa Fe Railyard Park. All screenings are free, and seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Other highlights include an appearance by Pulitzer prize-winning writer N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa), who will make remarks before the screening of the biographical film N. Scott Momaday: Words From a Bear Thursday, Aug. 15, at 7 p.m. A “State of the Arts” talk is scheduled for Friday, Aug. 16, at 3 p.m. and will feature Tlingit glass artist Preston Singletary.



N. Scott Momaday (left) receiving the National Medal of Arts from U.S. president George W. Bush in 2007 /photo courtesy of the National Endowment for the Arts / Public Domain

Navarre Scott Momaday (born February 27, 1934) is a Kiowa novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. His novel House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1969, and is considered the first major work of the Native American Renaissance. His follow-up work The Way to Rainy Mountain blended folklore with memoir. Momaday received the National Medal of Arts in 2007 for his work’s celebration and preservation of indigenous oral and art tradition. He holds twenty honorary degrees from colleges and universities, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

“You see, I am alive, I am alive
I stand in good relation to the Gods
I stand in good relation to the earth
I stand in good relation to everything that is beautiful…
You see, I am alive, I am alive”

Navarre Scott Momaday, excerpt from The Delight Song of Tsoai-Talee



Showcase Schedule

Tuesday, Aug. 13

7 p.m.: Warrior Women (USA, 2018, 64 min.)

Followed by a discussion with activist Marcella Gilbert (Lakota and Dakota /Cheyenne River Lakota Nation) and directors Christina D. King (Seminole Tribe of Oklahoma) and Elizabeth A. Castle.

Wednesday, Aug. 14

1 p.m.: Wiñaypacha (Eternity) (Peru, 2017, 87 min.)

3 p.m.: The Blessing (USA, 2018, 74 min.)

Followed by a discussion with directors Hunter Robert Baker and Jordan Fein and producer Laura Ball.

7 p.m.: Falls Around Her (Canada, 2018, 98 min.)

Thursday, Aug. 15

1 p.m.: Angelique’s Isle (Canada, 2018, 90min.) preceded by Ara Marumaru (The Shadow) (New Zealand, 2018, 8 min.)

3 p.m.: “The Land Speaks” shorts program (86 min. total)

Seven short films emphasize Native knowledge of the environment and the look into its future.

7 p.m.: N. Scott Momaday: Words From a Bear (USA, 2018, 85 min.)

Friday, Aug. 16

1 p.m.: “Future Focused” shorts program (55 min. total)

This program features films that present innovative stories from First Nations and U.S. Native communities.

3 p.m.: “State of the Art” conversation with Preston Singletary

7 p.m.: SGaawaay K’uuna (Edge of the Knife) (Canada, 2018, 100 min.) preceded by Mahiganiec

(Baby Wolf) (Canada, 2017, 5 min.)

Followed by a discussion with filmmaker Gwaai Edenshaw (Haida) and musician and composer Kinnie Starr (Mohawk)

Saturday, Aug. 17

1 p.m.: Lensic Future Voices (90 min. total)

This program includes a selection of films by student filmmakers. Presented in collaboration with Lensic Performing Arts Center and Santa Fe Photographic Workshops. Introduced by Marcella Ernest (Bad River Band of Chippewa), Project Director, Lensic Future Voices.

3 p.m.: Our Stories Shorts (86 min. total)

This program reflects the best of Native storytelling as told through family history, language and tradition, often with a dose of Native humor.

8 p.m.: Ralph Breaks the Internet, screened outdoors at the Santa Fe Railyard Park Screen.

Sunday, Aug. 18

1 p.m.: Rise Above Shorts (86 min. total)

The realities of rising above adversity, loving oneself and the journey of learning life’s lessons is the focus of this program.

3 p.m: Vai (New Zealand, 2018, 90 min.) preceded by Katatjatuuk Kangirsumi/Throat Singing in  

Kangirsuk (Canada, 2018, 3 min.) and Pire (Argentina, 2018, 3 min.)

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian

In partnership with Native peoples and their allies, the National Museum of the American Indian fosters a richer shared human experience through a more informed understanding of Native peoples. The museum strives toward equity and social justice for the Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere through education, inspiration and empowerment. Through two locations, it features exhibitions and programs in New York City and the National Mall in Washington, D.C. For additional information, including hours and directions, visit AmericanIndian.si.edu. Follow the museum via social media on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, where additional information will be available at #NativeCinemaShowcase.

About the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts

SWAIA’s (http://swaia.org/) mission is to bring Native arts to the world by inspiring artistic excellence, fostering education and creating meaningful partnerships. The 98th annual Santa Fe Indian Market will display the work of more than 1,100 artists from 100 tribes in more than 1,000 booths over a two-day period.

About the New Mexico History Museum

Opened in May 2009 as the state system’s newest museum, the New Mexico History Museum is attached to the Palace of the Governors National Historic Landmark, a distinctive emblem of U.S. history and the original seat of New Mexico government. The museum presents exhibitions and public programs that interpret historical events and reflect on the wide range of New Mexico historical experiences. It is a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs and is located at 113 Lincoln Ave. in Santa Fe.

The content of this post is courtesy of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, The Southwestern Association of Indian Arts, the New Mexico History Museum, the National Endowment for the Arts, imbd and Wikipedia.


ABOUT

Recent in digital publications: 
* Four poemsI Am Not a Silent Poet
* From the Small Beginning, Entropy Magazine (Enclave, #Final Poems)(July 2019)
* Over His Morning Coffee, Front Porch Review (July 2019)
Upcoming in digital publications:
* The Damask Garden, In a Woman’s Voice (August 2019)

A busy though bed-bound poet, writer, former columnist and the former associate editor of a regional employment newspaper, my work has been featured widely in print and digital publications including: Levure littéraireRamingo’s Porch, Vita Brevis Literature, HerStry, Connotation Press, The Bar None Group, Salamander CoveI Am Not a Silent Poet, Meta/ Phor(e) /Play, Woven Tale PressThe Compass Rose and California Woman. I run The Poet by Day, a curated info hub for poets and writers. I founded The Bardo Group/Beguines, a virtual literary community and publisher of The BeZine of which I am the founding and managing editor. Among others, I’ve been featured on The MethoBlog, on the Plumb Tree’s Wednesday Poet’s Corner, and several times as Second Light Live featured poet.

Email me at thepoetbyday@gmail.com for permissions, reprint rights, or comissions.


“Every pair of eyes facing you has probably experienced something you could not endure.”  Lucille Clifton

Just a reminder activist poets and other artists and friends: it’s that time of year again . . .

“In the last few days over 20 groups have contacted us to sign up to organize an event for the 100 Thousand Poets for Change global celebration. I take this as a sign! It is time to put out the call! So far 150 events are confirmed for September 28. Will you organize a poetry event for peace, justice, sustainability in your town for this years 100 Thousand Poets for Change global action? If so, please [connect with me].” 100TPC Cofounder, Michael Rothenburg, July 7, 2019


HEADS-UP EVERYONE. We encourage you to organize a 100,000 Poets and Friends for Change event in your area or to find one that is already scheduled near you so that you can participate.  For information and to register your event contact:

MICHAEL ROTHENBERG on Facebook. Or link HERE.
Among the 150 already confirmed is The BeZine virtual 100,000 Poets and Friends for Change to which all are invited no matter where in the world you live. More news forthcoming on July 15.

ABOUT

Recent in digital publications: 
* Four poemsI Am Not a Silent Poet
* Remembering Mom, HerStry
* Three poems, Levure littéraire
Upcoming in digital publications:
* Over His Morning Coffee, Front Porch Review (July 2019)
* From the Small Beginning, Entropy Magazine (Enclave, #Final Poems)(July 2019)
* The Damask Garden, In a Woman’s Voice (August 2019)

A busy though bed-bound poet, writer, former columnist and the former associate editor of a regional employment newspaper, my work has been featured widely in print and digital publications including: Ramingo’s Porch, Vita Brevis Literature, Connotation Press, The Bar None Group, Salamander CoveI Am Not a Silent Poet, Meta/ Phor(e) /Play, Woven Tale PressThe Compass Rose and California Woman. I run The Poet by Day, a curated info hub for poets and writers. I founded The Bardo Group/Beguines, a virtual literary community and publisher of The BeZine of which I am the founding and managing editor. I’ve been featured on The MethoBlog, on the Plumb Tree’s Wednesday Poet’s Corner, and several times as Second Light Live featured poet.

Email me at thepoetbyday@gmail.com for permissions, reprint rights, or comissions.


“Every pair of eyes facing you has probably experienced something you could not endure.”  Lucille Clifton


Webby Award to The Poetry Foundation, Resource for Poets and Poetry Lovers

May 2019 issue of Poetry

“The oldest monthly devoted to verse in the English-speaking world.”



The Poetry Foundation, poetry website host and publisher of publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in American culture, The Foundation was named the Best Charitable Organizations/Non-Profit Website in the 23rd Annual Webby Awards.  The Foundation was honored at a ceremony on Monday evening, May 13, in New York City. Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by the New York Times, The Webby Awards, presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS), is the leading international awards organization honoring excellence on the Internet.



The first Poetry issue, October 1912 / public domain

The Poetry Foundation Website, Resource for Poets and Poetry Lovers

The Poetry Foundation website reaches a global audience of poem enthusiasts, students and educators, and the culturally curious. The website features the most robust online poem archive available, more than 4,000 poet biographies, six podcasts, and multiple newsletters. In 2018, poetryfoundation.org added 300 new poet biographies, 900 new poems to the archive, 35 feature articles, and averaged 3.9 million monthly visitors.



“Our goal is to reach and engage a broad audience with poetry,” said Harlan Wallach, Poetry Foundation chief technology officer and director of digital programs. “We’re humbled to recognize the countless contributors, poets, writers, artists, illustrators, and editors who bring new poetry content to the Internet every day.”

If you are viewing this post from an email subscription, you’ll likely have to link through to the site to view this video to senior editor James Sitar delivering the five-word (customary at the Webbly’s) acceptance speech:

IADAS, which nominates and selects the Webby Award winners, is comprised of digital industry experts, including Instagram’s head of fashion partnerships Eva Chen, director of Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society Susan P. Crawford, actor and activist Jesse Williams, GE CMO Linda Boff, Pod Save the People host and activist DeRay Mckesson, Google’s head of conversation design Cathy Pearl, Fortnite designer Eric Williamson, HBO digital chief Diane Tryneski, Los Angeles Laker Isaiah Thomas, and DDB Worldwide CEO Wendy Clark.

A full list of both The Webby Awards and Webby People’s Voice winners can be found at webbyawards.com/winners.

About the Poetry Foundation
The Poetry Foundation exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. The Poetry Foundation seeks to be a leader in shaping a receptive climate for poetry by developing new audiences, creating new avenues for delivery, and encouraging new kinds of poetry through innovative literary prizes and programs.

Follow the Poetry Foundation and Poetry on Facebook at facebook.com/poetryfoundation,  Twitter @PoetryFound and @Poetrymagazine, and Instagram @PoetryFoundation.

About The Webby Awards
Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by the New York Times, The Webby Awards is the leading international awards organization honoring excellence on the Internet, including Websites, Video, Advertising, Media & PR, Apps, Mobile, and Voice, Social, Podcasts, and Games. Established in 1996, this year’s Webby Awards received nearly 13,000 entries from all 50 states and 70 countries worldwide. The Webby Awards is presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS). Sponsors and Partners of The Webby Awards include: Instagram, WP Engine, EY, YouGov, Vitamin T, YouTube, WNYC Studios, Fast Company, ESA, Product Hunt, and Social Media Week.

Find The Webby Awards Online:
Website: www.webbyawards.com
Facebook: Facebook.com/TheWebbyAwards
Snapchat: TheWebbyAwards
Twitter: @TheWebbyAwards
YouTube: www.youtube.com/webby

This post is courtesy of The Poetry Foundation, Poetry Magazine, and the Webbly Awards.


ABOUT

Recent in digital publications: 
* Four poems in “I Am Not a Silent Poet”
* Remembering Mom in HerStry
* Three poems in Levure littéraire
Upcoming in digital publications:
“Over His Morning Coffee,” Front Porch Review

A homebound writer, poet, and former columnist and associate editor of a regional employment newspaper, my work has been featured widely in print and digital publications including: Ramingo’s Porch, Vita Brevis Literature, Connotation Press, The Bar None Group, Salamander Cove, I Am Not a Silent Poet, The Compass Rose and California Woman. I run The Poet by Day, an info hub for poets and writers and am the founding/managing editor of The BeZine.


“Every pair of eyes facing you has probably experienced something you could not endure.”  Lucille Clifton

Dog Lovers’ Calls for Submissions

Bob Seger Dedes

Now dogs pretend they like to fight;
They often bark, more seldom bite;
But yet a Dog is, on the whole,
What you would call a simple soul.
Of course I’m not including Pekes,
And such fantastic canine freaks.
The usual Dog about the Town
Is much inclined to play the clown
And far from showing too much pride
Is frequently undignified.
He’s very easily taken in-
Just chuck him underneath the chin
Or slap his back or shake his paw,
And he will gambol and guffaw.
He’s such an easy-going lout,
He’ll answer any hail or shout.

Again I must remind you that
A Dog’s a Dog – A CAT’S A CAT.

Except from T.S. Elliot’s “Addressing Cats” in Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats



ANIMAL WELLNESS MAGAZINE is a natural health magazine that publishes articles and stories on dogs and cats. Submissions details HERE.

THE BARK publishes dog-centered articles and stories and is open for unsolicited submissions and queries. Details HERE.

SUNDRESS PUBLICATIONS has an open call for submissions to The Familiar Wild: On Dogs and Poetry, “an anthology that centers the storied, yet perpetually mystifying connection that dogs and humans share with a new focus: the historical and contemporary relationships between poets and dogs.”  Deadline: July 1, 2019. Details HERE.

EVENT: Erie Pennsylvania ~