Webby Award to The Poetry Foundation, Resource for Poets and Poetry Lovers

May 2019 issue of Poetry

“The oldest monthly devoted to verse in the English-speaking world.”



The Poetry Foundation, poetry website host and publisher of publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in American culture, The Foundation was named the Best Charitable Organizations/Non-Profit Website in the 23rd Annual Webby Awards.  The Foundation was honored at a ceremony on Monday evening, May 13, in New York City. Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by the New York Times, The Webby Awards, presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS), is the leading international awards organization honoring excellence on the Internet.



The first Poetry issue, October 1912 / public domain

The Poetry Foundation Website, Resource for Poets and Poetry Lovers

The Poetry Foundation website reaches a global audience of poem enthusiasts, students and educators, and the culturally curious. The website features the most robust online poem archive available, more than 4,000 poet biographies, six podcasts, and multiple newsletters. In 2018, poetryfoundation.org added 300 new poet biographies, 900 new poems to the archive, 35 feature articles, and averaged 3.9 million monthly visitors.



“Our goal is to reach and engage a broad audience with poetry,” said Harlan Wallach, Poetry Foundation chief technology officer and director of digital programs. “We’re humbled to recognize the countless contributors, poets, writers, artists, illustrators, and editors who bring new poetry content to the Internet every day.”

If you are viewing this post from an email subscription, you’ll likely have to link through to the site to view this video to senior editor James Sitar delivering the five-word (customary at the Webbly’s) acceptance speech:

IADAS, which nominates and selects the Webby Award winners, is comprised of digital industry experts, including Instagram’s head of fashion partnerships Eva Chen, director of Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society Susan P. Crawford, actor and activist Jesse Williams, GE CMO Linda Boff, Pod Save the People host and activist DeRay Mckesson, Google’s head of conversation design Cathy Pearl, Fortnite designer Eric Williamson, HBO digital chief Diane Tryneski, Los Angeles Laker Isaiah Thomas, and DDB Worldwide CEO Wendy Clark.

A full list of both The Webby Awards and Webby People’s Voice winners can be found at webbyawards.com/winners.

About the Poetry Foundation
The Poetry Foundation exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. The Poetry Foundation seeks to be a leader in shaping a receptive climate for poetry by developing new audiences, creating new avenues for delivery, and encouraging new kinds of poetry through innovative literary prizes and programs.

Follow the Poetry Foundation and Poetry on Facebook at facebook.com/poetryfoundation,  Twitter @PoetryFound and @Poetrymagazine, and Instagram @PoetryFoundation.

About The Webby Awards
Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by the New York Times, The Webby Awards is the leading international awards organization honoring excellence on the Internet, including Websites, Video, Advertising, Media & PR, Apps, Mobile, and Voice, Social, Podcasts, and Games. Established in 1996, this year’s Webby Awards received nearly 13,000 entries from all 50 states and 70 countries worldwide. The Webby Awards is presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS). Sponsors and Partners of The Webby Awards include: Instagram, WP Engine, EY, YouGov, Vitamin T, YouTube, WNYC Studios, Fast Company, ESA, Product Hunt, and Social Media Week.

Find The Webby Awards Online:
Website: www.webbyawards.com
Facebook: Facebook.com/TheWebbyAwards
Snapchat: TheWebbyAwards
Twitter: @TheWebbyAwards
YouTube: www.youtube.com/webby

This post is courtesy of The Poetry Foundation, Poetry Magazine, and the Webbly Awards.


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Recent in digital publications: 
* Four poems in “I Am Not a Silent Poet”
* Remembering Mom in HerStry
* Three poems in Levure littéraire
Upcoming in digital publications:
“Over His Morning Coffee,” Front Porch Review

A homebound writer, poet, and former columnist and associate editor of a regional employment newspaper, my work has been featured widely in print and digital publications including: Ramingo’s Porch, Vita Brevis Literature, Connotation Press, The Bar None Group, Salamander Cove, I Am Not a Silent Poet, The Compass Rose and California Woman. I run The Poet by Day, an info hub for poets and writers and am the founding/managing editor of The BeZine.


“Every pair of eyes facing you has probably experienced something you could not endure.”  Lucille Clifton

Words Without Borders: A Reading Challenge for 2019

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.” A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice and Fire), George R.R. Martin


The Poet by Day, Wednesday Writing Prompt will return on January 16. Meanwhile, here is a reading challenge for 2019. 

The very title of Words Without Borders (WWB) suggests an exciting and elegant theme for 2019 reading, for anytime and anywhere really, but let’s concentrate on this year and challenge ourselves to read poets and writers from cultures about which we know the least. My focus is going to be Catalonia and Pakistan, inspired by Catalonian Marta Pombo Sallés (Moments) and Pakistani Anjum Wasim Dar (Poetic Oceans). With regard to the later, I’ve started with An Anthology of Modern Urdu Poetry, edited and translated by M.A.R. Habib.

“And the second [is like the first], ‘ You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” The Aramaic Bible in Plain English

The injunction in the Abrahamic traditions is to love (respect) our neighbor. In tribal times our neighbors generally looked like us, spoke the same language, ate the same food, and subscribed to the same scriptures. But things change.

Today technological advances have made the world small, too small for tribalism. Too small for provincialism. Through air travel and The World Wide Web we are brought close. Visits to other parts of the world that would once have taken months by land or sea can be done in a few days by plane. Through blogging and social networking we make friends everywhere, no passports or visas needed.  Sometimes we are able to carve out the opportunity to meet with our virtual friends in person. Immigration and regional conflicts have had an impact as well. On a daily basis we rub elbows with people who are on the run in the search for safe harbor or have settled in our countries when their countries of origin are no longer viable. In our time our neighbors come in many hues and engage in diverse cultural traditions.  In this small, small world, everyone everywhere is our neighbor. Understanding not fear, books not bombs, are needed if we are to heal the crises of our day.

Words Without Borders facilitates cross-cultural understanding through the publication in English translation of works from writers representing the world’s literary wealth. As of this post, WWB reports that it has published in books and magazine some 2,200 writers from 124 countries. The site also hosts WWB Daily, a blog.

WWB’s submission guidelines for works in translation are HERE.

I appreciate World Without Borders because it helps us expand our reading, taking us beyond the familiar, obvious and/or habitual. It gives us a better quality reference than the best-seller lists.

Another engaging site – a poetry site that crosses borders – is The Poetry Translation Centre, which offers translations into English of contemporary poems from African, Asian and Latin American poets. It was founded in 2004 by English poet and translator Sarah Maguire who died in November the year before last.

Both Words Without Borders and The Poetry Translation Centre seek to expand our understanding and to celebrate the finest writers and literature from around the world. As you read the literature of the country on which you decide to focus for 2019, don’t forget to research its history and current events so that you understand the work and the author in context.

© 2019, words, Jamie Dedes; public domain airline poster Europe to South America in Three Days courtesy of the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive


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Poet and writer, I was once columnist and associate editor of a regional employment publication. I currently run this site, The Poet by Day, an information hub for poets and writers. I am the managing editor of The BeZine published by The Bardo Group Beguines (originally The Bardo Group), a virtual arts collective I founded.  I am a weekly contributor to Beguine Again, a site showcasing spiritual writers. My work is featured in a variety of publications and on sites, including: Levure littéraure, Ramingo’s PorchVita Brevis Literature,Compass Rose, Connotation PressThe Bar None GroupSalamander CoveSecond LightI Am Not a Silent PoetMeta / Phor(e) /Play, and California Woman. My poetry was recently read by Northern California actor Richard Lingua for Poetry Woodshed, Belfast Community Radio. I was featured in a lengthy interview on the Creative Nexus Radio Show where I was dubbed “Poetry Champion.”


The BeZine: Waging the Peace, An Interfaith Exploration featuring Fr. Daniel Sormani, Rev. Benjamin Meyers, and the Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi among others

“What if our religion was each other. If our practice was our life. If prayer, our words. What if the temple was the Earth. If forests were our church. If holy water–the rivers, lakes, and ocean. What if meditation was our relationships. If the teacher was life. If wisdom was self-knowledge. If love was the center of our being.” Ganga White, teacher and exponent of Yoga and founder of White Lotus, a Yoga center and retreat house in Santa Barbara, CA

“Every pair of eyes facing you has probably experienced something you could not endure.” Lucille Clifton

Levure littéraire, Vita Brevis, and The Literary Ladies Guide to the Writing Life



Worth your time:

  1. Levure littéraire is exceptional in so many ways. It’s worthy of your time and so clearly exhibits the thought, originality and hard work of its founder and editorial board, which includes Hélène Cardona and Aprilia Zank. The video below is an introduction to the 14th issue that will include three of my poems along with poetry, other writing and artwork by an impressive gathering of writers and artists. Roxanne Brousseau Felio created this stellar video. I don’t know when 14 will go up, but don’t wait to check it out. This international multilingual publication is not to be missed.
  2. Vita Brevis is a relatively new online poetry venue I introduced to you here some time ago.  I like the gentle grace of this modest effort and took a chance with the new kid on the block when it first crossed my radar. The reason I say “took a chance” is because if you have little or nothing to study as an example of style and values, you never know how things are going to turn out and it may turn out to be embarrassing. Vita Brevis is anything but embarrassing and is now open for submissions. I encourage you to visit, read and submit. You can read my submission HERE.


A CELEBRATION OF LITERARY WOMEN

OFFERS INSIGHT AND INSPIRATION

I recently discovered this delightful site, The Literary Ladies Guide to the Writing Life. I’m addicted. So very many old friends featured there and some new-to-me-writers. A fabulous and most enjoyable find. Lit Ladies is on Facebook HERE. The website is HERE.  Enjoy!


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