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THE GROOVY GRANNY, A Collection of Poems for Young and Young at Heart

KAYLA MAE STEWART AT FIVE YEARS

The artist preparing the illustration for her mom’s poem On Bad Days

ON BAD DAYS Illustration

But, the talk of the town?

That’s certainly me

I can make a snow fort and

a good cup of tea!

From Gadget Snow Pants a poem by Heather Grace Stewart in The Groovy Granny

Dust bunnies and dress-up and adults who are sillier than their kids and have more energy too: that’s what you’ll find in Heather Grace Stewart’s new and colorful collection of poems for big kids and their little ones, The Groovy Granny, a mother-daughter collaboration.  Heather wrote the poems and Kayla did the illustrations.

The Groovy Granny is a collection of sixteen poems.  I particularly liked Adults Are Funny. I remember a time when my son was a toddler and he told our neighbor, Gussy, that he had to wear his sweater because “Mama’s cold.”

ADULTS ARE FUNNY

by

Healther Grace Stewart, all rights reserved

·

Adults are funny,

don’t you thinK?

When they’re thirsty

they get you a drink.

 ·

When they’re cold

they get you a sweater.

When meeting a stranger

they’ll talk about weather.

 ·

When they’re tired

they say:

“Get your sleep!”

Have you noticed the strange things

they eat?

 ·

What odd expressions!

Instead of: “We’ll see.”

It’s: “Well cross that bridge

when we come to it.”

(SO confusing to me!)

 ·

Adults and clothes?

They buy new stuff

with passion,

then, the very next year,

it all goes out of fashion.

 ·

I’m glad I’m a kid.

Adults are funny.

I just want to be one

so I can make money!

·

HEATHER GRACE STEWART, Canadian Poet

Heather blogs at Where the Butterflies Go

and A Children’s Poetry Place

All poetry, art work, and photographs are the exclusive copyrighted property of Heather Grace Stewart, posted here with permission.

Δ

Many poet-bloggers already know Heather from Morning’s (formerly Jingle) fun poet-blogger community activities, Thursday Poet’s Rally and The Gooseberry Garden Picnic (formerly Poetry Potluck). I haven’t had time recently to join the fun. I don’t think Heather has either, but if you are a poet-blogger and you have time, you might enjoy getting involved.

BIG DOODLE HEAD PRESENTS

A fish with a feline-sized appetite … A strip poker swindling bear … A land where all the letters of the alphabet spell well together… A man with an uncanny photographic ability … And (of course) a candy store in space. MORE [BIG DOODLE HEAD]

When Aleza Freeman (author) and Howard Freeman (illustrator) put their heads and their talents together after the birth of their son, Evan, there was another birth in the family: a publishing company, Big Doodle Head with a cute book of poems and drawings for “kids & the kid at heart”, Candy Store at the Edge of the Galaxy.

Some readers here will recognize Aleza as one of the poets in our online poetry community. She’s a former official of Jingle Poetry, which sponsored Poetry Potluck. (That effort has transitioned now to The Gooseberry Garden, sponsoring the weekly Poetry Picnic.)

Aleza says,  “As new parents, Howard and I set out to create a book that our son will love, not only now, but even as he grows older. We hope our book sparks the imagination of all who read it, or at the very least makes them smile. Candy Store at the Edge of the Galaxy is an edgy 36-page full-color paperback for young readers. It features twelve quirky poems with drawings encouraging imagination, friendship, tolerance and general silliness.”

Here’s one sample from the book:

WOMB

Just kickin’ it

in my mother’s womb.

Been here some time.

I’ve run out of room.

·

The accommodations

are all-inclusive,

comfy, snuggly,

and exclusive.

·

The days passed by

I grew and grew

now nine months later

I’m almost due.

·

Though it’s quiet and

warm and cozy inside, 

it’s time to prepare 

for a wild ride.

© 2011 Big Doodle Head, LLC

Aleza says that Big Doodle Head is just getting started. She and hubby Howard are working on several more books and a musical soundtrack.

Candy Store at the Edge of the Galaxy is available from online retailers including Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble.com.

Δ

TODAY’S THEME ON
IS
BUDDHISM
Among the features is
my review of
Jane Hershfield’s
Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry

SECOND LIGHT NETWORK

Dilys Wood

Dilys Wood is poet, editor and convenor of Second Light Network of Women Poets. She has edited four anthologies of women’s poetry, mainly with Myra Schneider and has published two collections of poetry, Women Come to a Death and Antarctica.

SECOND LIGHT NETWORK OF WOMEN POETS

(SLN)

by

Dilys Woods 

I founded Second Light (SLN), a network of over 300 women poets aged over forty, in 1994. We followed this forteen years later with ARTEMISpoetry, a journal for women’s poetry.

The best feedback for me is that a group of members have met informally or that two members are exchanging poems. Other good news is of members’ successes in national competitions and enthusiastic reports of our annual events, including a poetry competition, two-day festivals in London (Spring and Autumn), and an residential course.

SLN events are supportive. The tone is constructive.There is no put-down for those over 50, over 70, or over 90. We welcome younger women poets as Associate Members.

The inspiration for Second Light was that vibrant, exciting work is absolutely not sex or age-related. Probably all serious editors and organisers know this, but some number-crunchers are obsessed with youth, trendiness, or any kind of gimic. There may be reverence for famous older poets, but the pattern of women’s lives may mean that a woman may be a ‘new poet’, just starting to publish, at any time up to old age.

The other aspect of SLN’s work – aspiration – was latent in the original mission and has flourished because so many members are talented and ambitious.We play to these strengths by choosing distinguished poets to lead workshops and to contribute to ARTEMISpoetry. We also regularly interview and review for the magazine important women poets not born in/living in the UK.

Five anthologies and three individual collections show-case members’ work. Each member may post a poem and CV details on our website (www.secondlightlive.co.uk). ARTEMISpoetry – open to any woman poet to submit – carries many poems and we offer far more reviews of women’s collections than most magazines.

For more details of SLN see our website HERE.


THE NEW SAPPHOS

Dilys Wood

Dilys Wood is poet, editor and convenor of Second Light Network of Women Poets. She has edited four anthologies of women’s poetry, mainly with Myra Schneider and has published two collections of poetry, Women Come to a Death and Antarctica. 

Women Come to a Death
Poetry. 1997. 57 pages. ISBN 0 904872 28 9. £6.95.

Death is both personal and political in this remarkable collection, which begins with the magnificent long poem, ‘The Death of a Safety Officer’, a dialogue between the dying man and a chorus of women, which relates the closure of the South Yorkshire pits and death of a way of life to the old age and death of an individual miner. The book closes with a sequence of poems where the author nurses her mother through death from cancer. They describe the painful detail of the illness and the strange suspension of normal life as mother and daughter spend these last revealing months together. Courtesy of Katabasis Books: English and Latin American Poetry and Prose

♦ ♦ ♦

Now that you know a bit about our guest blogger today, I hope you will take the time to enjoy this post. It’s the first of two. The next  I will publish tomorrow. J.D.

NEW SAPPHOS, CHALLENGES FOR WOMEN POETS

by

Dilys Wood 

I run a network for women poets and naturally I want our members to be treated equitably, with recognition of any woman’s potential to be in the top flight of creative artists.

Some poets feel that ‘male and female he made them’ should not be an issue. I disagree because I want to celebrate and gain personal inspiration from the last fifty years. There has been a vastly increased involvement of women as students of poetry, published poets, book purchasers and consumers of ‘products’ such as poetry festivals. I also want it debated why this has not meant equality of treatment.

Why do some leading journals publish fewer poems by women and use fewer women reviewers? What part is played by prejudice and what by our diffidence? Do we submit enough work and persist when submissions are rejected? Are there subtle shades of prejudice? Are we taken seriously on ‘women’s topics’ but not when writing about spiritual experience or politics?

A first step is to convince ourselves that there is no ceiling. Emily Dickinson surely lives up to the epithet ‘unique genius’? Her work is incredibly economical, dense, universal and deeply moving. She is totally original in style and thought. Her work alone ought to kill the slur that biology-based inferiority explains historical under-achievement.

So many more women have found now their voice. Let’s celebrate poets who excite us, from Emily Bronte (say) to Jorie Graham (say). We can also start thinking seriously about differences and about inflated reputations. Let’s be wary about ‘celebrity status’. This tends to narrows true appreciation. Read voraciously. Include lesser known poets and dead poets. You will be impressed by how much exciting writing is on offer.

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