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HEADS-UP SF BAY AREA: Reading with Michael Rothenberg, Owen Hill, Paul Corman-RoberTs and Youssef Alaui …

FullSizeRender-2Michael Rothenberg of Big Bridge magazine, 100,000 Poets for Change, and almost countless poetry books edited or written – not to mention Shell Dance Orchid Gardens in Pacifica –  says,

“Diversity of vision and style are the heart and soul of this reading, a momentous occasion of joyous and dark surprise.”

Sunday, March 6th, 5-8 p.m.
Art House Gallery, 2905 Shattuck Avenue (at Ashby), Berkeley

Featured poets include:
Michael Rothenberg
Owen Hill
Paul Corman-Roberts
Youssef Alaoui

Open reading sign-up at 5 p.m.
$5 – $10 donation suggested.

MICHAEL ROTHENBERG will bring his strange brew of San Francisco Renaissance meditations, savvy humor and political rant.

OWEN HILL, the wizard of Moe’s legendary reading series, is always smart and insightful and sets the stage for a noir apocalypse.

PAUL CORMAN ROBERTS, notoriously unable to see his forest for his trees brings a message yearning for community and justice tempered with a reckless if soulful heart.

YOUSSEF ALAOUI will engage the surreal and the fabulist with his strange dark melodies.

This is the first time these poets have read together and it might be the last. If you are in the area, join them for a night of celebration and exultation!

For more information contact: Clive Matson, 510-654-6495, clive@matsonpoet.com

Biographies

Owen Hill is currently finishing the annotations for the new edition of Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep. His most recent poetry collection is A Walk Among the Bogus from Lavender Ink Press in New Orleans.

Paul Corman-Roberts is a compulsive poet and a compulsive organizer. His latest collection of poems is called We Shoot Typewriters from Nomadic Press and he is a core-founder of Oakland’s Beast Crawl Festival. He once had coffee and donuts with Eldridge Cleaver.

Youssef Alaoui is known for his varied, dark, spiritual and carnal writings. His work has appeared in Exquisite Corpse, 580 Split, Cherry Bleeds, Carcinogenic Poetry, Red Fez. His work was nominated for the Pushcart prize. Youssef’s novella, The Blue Demon is available on Amazon and at other bookstores.

Michael Rothenberg
is a poet, editor and publisher of the online literary magazine Big Bridge,  and co-founder of 100 Thousand Poets for Change (100TPC).

Michael’s editorial work includes several volumes in the Penguin Poets series: Overtime by Philip Whalen, As Ever by Joanne Kyger, David’s Copy by David Meltzer, and Way More West by Ed Dorn.

His poetry books include Unhurried Vision (La Alameda/University of New Mexico Press), Indefinite Detentions: A Dog Story (Shabda Press USA and Ekstasis Press CANADA) and Murder (Paper Book Press). Drawing The Shade is due out from Dos Madres Press in 2016.

© 2016, illustration, Jamie Dedes, All rights reserved

The Mission …

Hand of Fire, Hand of Creation<br/>Moshe Dekel (age 5)
Hand of Fire, Hand of Creation by Moshe Dekel (age 5)

Reblogged from: The BeZine blog, 26 September 2015.  This is our mission for our 100TPC event, which is still open to submission from you. Much appreciation to Michael Dickel for this and for MCing the day …

Welcome to the 5th year of 100,000 Poets (Musicians, Artists, Mimes…) for Change, and the 2015 edition of The BeZine Online 100TPC Event! If you’ve done this before and you know the score, skip to the comments or Mister Linky at the bottom of the post and begin. If you are wondering, hey, what are you folks up to then check out some serious non-fiction here:

Our mission here today as poets, writers, artists, photographers, musicians and friends is a sort-of fission for change—a burning with and expression of the desire for peace, environmental and economic sustainability, social justice, inclusion, equity and opportunity for all. We seek through our art to do a bit of old-fashioned consciousness raising, to stimulate thought and action leading to the kind of change that is sustainable, compassionate and just, and to engage in the important theme of the issues facing humanity today—but all with a goal to alleviate suffering and foster peace. We don’t want to just “talk about it,” we want words, art and music that help us take action in some way for positive change wherever we are in our lives, in our world.

We see a complex inter-woven relationship between peace, sustainability, and social justice. We all recognize that when people are marginalized and disenfranchised, when they are effectively barred from opportunities for education and viable employment, when they can’t feed themselves or their families or are used as slave labor, there will inevitably be a backlash, and we’re seeing that now in violent conflicts, wars and dislocation. Climatologists have also linked climate change, with its severe weather changes and recent droughts, to the rise violence in the world, and even contributing to inequities in areas – like Syria – where a severe drought destabilized food production and the economy, contributing to the unrest that led to the civil war, according to one study.

Jerusalem in an unprecedented dust storm that engulged much of the Mideast, linked by one climate scientist to the Syrian civial war and ISIS conflict
Jerusalem in an unprecedented dust storm that engulfed much of the Mideast, linked by one climate scientist to the Syrian civil war and ISIS conflict

There are too many people living on the streets and in refugee camps, too many whose lives are at subsistence level, too many children who die before the age of five (as many as four a minute dying from hunger, according to one reliable study—more info), too many youth walking through life with no education, no jobs and no hope. It can’t end well…

Syrian refugee camp, photo: The Telegraph
Syrian refugee camp
photo: The Telegraph

More than anything, our mission is a call to action, a call to work in your own communities where ever you are in the world, and to focus on the pressing local issues that contribute to conflict, injustice, and unsustainable economic and environmental practices. The kind of change we need may well have to be from the ground up, all of us working together to create peaceful, sustainable and just cultures that nurture the best in all the peoples of this world.

Poverty and homelessness are evergreen issues historically, but issues also embedded in social and political complexity. They benefit the rich, whose economic system keeps most of the rest of us as, at best, “wage slaves,” and all too many of us in poverty, without enough to provide for basic needs or housing (including the “working poor,” who hold low-paying jobs while CEOs are paid record-breaking salaries and bonuses in the global capitalist system). We are united in our cries against the structures of injustice, where the rich act as demigods and demagogues. We have to ask of what use will all their riches be in the face of this inconceivable suffering and the inevitable backlash from the marginalized and disenfranchised. We need fairness, not greed.

So, with this mission in mind, and with the complexity of the interrelationships of social justice, sustainability and peace as a framework, we focus on hunger and poverty, two basic issues and major threads in the system of inequality and injustice that need addressing throughout the world.

We look forward to what you have to share, whether the form is poetry, essay, fiction, art, photography, documentary, music, or hybrids of any of these—and we want to engage in an ongoing conversation through your comments on all of the above as you not only share your own work here today but visit and enjoy the work of others, supporting one another with your “likes” and comments, starting or entering into dialogues with writers, artists and musicians throughout the world and online viewers, readers, listeners.

Think globally, act locally, form community.

—Michael Dickel, Jerusalem (with G. Jamie Dedes, California, USA)

DIRECTIONS FOR PARTICIPATION

Share links to your relevant work or that of others in a comment The BeZine blog post HERE or by using Mister Linky below. To use Mister Linky, just click on the graphic. (Note: If you are sharing someone else’s work, please use your name in Mister Linky, so we can credit you as the contributor—we will give the author / artist name in the comments, from the link when we post the link in a comment.)

You may leave your links or works in the comment section of The BeZine post HERE. If you are sharing the work of another poet or artist, however, please only use a link and not the work itself.

In addition to sharing, we encourage you to visit others and make connections and conversation. To visit the links, click on Mister Linky (the Mister Linky graphic above) and then on the links you see there. (Some Mister Linky-links can be viewed in the comments section after we re-post them.)

28 September 2015 note: In addition to what you’ll find through Mister Linky, you’ll see that there are many many pieces in the comments section or links to them.  We haven’t tallied everything yet, but we think we’re approaching 75 or 80 works.  J.D.

Thank you! 

All links will be collected into a dedicated Page here at The BeZine and also archived at 100TPC.

Thank you for your participation. Let the conversation begin …

Today’s the Day … the Miracle Is Love, the Message Is Peace

Join us at The BeZine blog for our virtual 100,000 Poets et al for Change, that is Peace, Sustainability and Social Justice.  Share your work.  Join the conversation.  Find the ways in which you might be part of the solution.

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And, at four p.m. today, remember this:

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DOES THIS BOTHER YOU?