A Whistle on the Wind, a poem

who knew …
Time was fading like a whistle on the wind,
that you wouldn’t have wealth or forever.
Who knew you had to capture short-lived youth,
relish it like the salt in a rich savory stew, dance
to the music of that age, dress in its pastels.

and who knew …
That all those years you worked at survival,
life would slip by, that holding-on was like
trying to grasp an ocean in your hands.
Suddenly, the moment had passed when you
could layer the joys of life’s spring in the basket
of your heart; now like old photo albums
you pull them out on occasion, unpacking
aspirations built on the fault lines of time.

how could you have known, my friend
That while you were busy with survival
the blue planet spun; in its ceaseless whorl,
the years passed and life changed, but now
you discover that you’ve changed too
and change comes baring its own gifts.

“Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars.” Khalil Gibran

© 2017, poem and photograph,Jamie Dedes, All rights reserved


The recommended read for this week is Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast by Pulitzer Prize winning Megan Marshall who studied with Bishop at Harvard. This biography is richly spun,  energetic, engaging and even inspirational despite the breathtaking depth of Bishop’s losses, her sense of marginalization and her head-long push into alcoholism. Indeed, some of the inspiration comes because with all her loses, Bishop managed to hold poetry tight. Her poems were for her a charm “against the loneliness they often expressed.” The book covers Bishop’s relationships with other poets and her romantic interests, the last was for me the singular wearisome downside, much overrided though by the book’s pleasures and values. It is laced with Marshall’s own stories and together the lives of these two bare witness to the power of words to give shape, sense and meaning to life. We come away with a strong sense of Elizabeth Bishop, one of America’s most extraordinary poets. A page-turner. A must read or everyone who loves and writes poetry.

By shopping at Amazon through The Word Play Shop and using the book links embedded in posts, you help to support the maintenance of this site. Thank you! (Some book links will just lead to info about the book or poet/author and not to Amazon.)

The WordPlay Shop offers books and other tools especially selected for poets and writers.

THE WORDPLAY SHOP: books, tools and supplies for poets, writers and readers

LITERATURE AND FICTION oo Editor’s Picks oo Award Winners oo NY Times Best Sellers

7 thoughts on “A Whistle on the Wind, a poem

    1. Yes! I would agree and thank you for saying so. That’s actually the spirit of what I mean but that word wouldn’t work in the poem. Needed one syllable. That may change as this is one I keep rewriting to get it where I want. Still not satisfied. Michael, I hope today finds you well and full of joy.

      Liked by 1 person

Thank you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s